Welcome to Smith County!

 

Welcome to Smith County, Mississippi Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide visitors with free resources for genealogical and / or historical research.

To share your genealogy or history information, send an email to msghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information related to other Mississippi Counties, consider clicking on the MSGHN link in the Main Menu and visit the appropriate county. Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!

Many thanks to Karen with Feather Graphics Web Design for allowing us to use her photos and other elements in our website!



Recently Added...

The following is only a part of what you will find here at Smith County MSGHN.

1841 Mississippi State Census for Smith County including heads of households and number of people living in household.

Jones Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. This cemetery is located on Highway 35 about a mile north of Highway 28. 315212N, 0893148W.

Unity Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Located on Smith County Road 80 at intersection with Highway 37.

Concord Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Located in western Smith County on County Road 60 about 1/2 mile east of County Road 57.

Old Zion Hill Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Old Zion Cemetery is located on County Road 20 about 1/3 mile northeast of County Road 20A.

Burnett Cemetery #2 burial listing with tombstone photos. Burnett cemetery #2 is located east of the Center Ridge community on County Road 801 just north of County Road 80.

Sullivan Cemetery #3 burial listing with tombstone photos. Sullivan cemetery #3 is located south of Mize on County Road 39 about a half mile south of Highway 35.

Ware Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Ware Cemetery is located in the southwestern part of the county on County Road 63 just north of County Road 60.

South Raleigh Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. South Raleigh Cemetery is located south of the Union Community on Highway 35 just north of County Road 88.

Tillson Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Tillson Cemetery is located south of the Union Community on Highway 35 just north of County Road 88.

Tom Sullivan Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. In the south-west corner of the county on County Road 36 just west of County Road 51.

Shady Grove Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. South of the Shady Grove Community on County Road 503 just north of County Road 64.

Thomas F. Sullivan Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Just south of the Zion Hill Community on Highway 35.

McAlpin Family Cemetery burial listing with tombstone photos. Just south of the Union Community on Hwy 35 at County Road 88.

Thousands of Smith County marriage records.



About Smith County...

The land that was to become Smith County, Mississippi was once home to Native American Indian tribes such as the Chickasaw, Choctaw, and others. This area was part of the Choctaw Indian Nation until the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in 1830. This was the last treaty between the United States and the Choctaw Nation.

Several years after the treaty, on 23 Dec 1833, Smith county was one of several counties formed from this newly acquired land.

Smith County was named in honor of Major David Smith of Hinds County (born in 1753 in Anson County, NC). Major Smith had served as a private in the Continental Army during the revolutionary war at Kings Mountain, Cowpens, and Euthaw Springs. He first married in 1776 to Sarah Terry and later in 1791 married Obedience Fort and moved with his family to Mississippi, settling in Hinds County. His son, Benjamin F. Smith, served as the first representative for Hinds County in the Mississippi Legistlature. Major Smith died at Jackson, MS in 1834. His daughter, Aurelia, married Governor Runnels.

Today's Highway 531 in Smith County runs along what was once Andrew Jackson's Military Road, according to most historians. This road was a Nashville to New Orleans route improved by the federal government and later named in honor of Jackson.

When the area now known as Smith County opened up to the public, settlers were quick to arrive. Coming primarily from Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, as well as other areas of Mississippi, these settlers, like so many others settling other parts of the southern frontier, faced hard times. Churches and schools soon sprang up in small communities throughout the county. The close-knit groups depended on each other to make it through the tough times.

The first county seat was in Fairfield, about four miles south of the location of present-day Raleigh. The county seat was later moved to Raleigh, which was named in honor of the explorer Sir Walter Raleigh. Over the years, Smith County has suffered three courthouse fires. Sadly, many valuable historic records have been lost through these tragedies. Smith County is known throughout the region for its watermelons.

The county has a total area of 637.27 square miles, of which 635.89 square miles is land and 1.38 square mile (0.22%) is water. The population recorded in the 1840 Federal Census was 1,961. The 2010 census recorded 16,491 residents in the county.

Neigboring counties are Scott County (north), Jasper County (east), Jones County (southeast), Covington County (south), Simpson County (west), and Rankin County (northwest). Communities in the county include Mize, Raleigh, Taylorsville, Polkville, Sylvarena, Burns, and Summerland.

 

 

Smith County Records

Smith County MSGHN has many records here on our website. Marriage Records, Cemetery listings with many tombstone photos, and more. Look at the Smith County Records links in the menu on the left for a list of available data.

Birth Records - The Mississippi Department of Health maintains records of births after November 1, 1912 on file. This was the year Mississippi began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by mail by using this birth record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recogn ized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health. Since there are no official birth records before November 1, 1912 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Mississippi Department of Health maintains births recorded after November 1, 1912 on file. This was the year Mississippi began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by mail by using this death record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recognized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health. Since there are no official death records before November 1, 1912 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records here on our website. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Mississippi Department of Health can provide you with this for marriages that took place between January 1, 1926 to June 30, 1938, and for January 1, 1942 to present by mail by using this marriage record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recognized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Circuit Clerk's office.

Divorce Records - Prior to 1859, divorce proceedings were introduced as private bills in the Mississippi State Legislature. References to these can be found in the books Index of Mississippi Session Acts 1817 - 1865 and Index to the Laws of the Mississippi Territory. These books can be found at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History as well as many other genealogy repositories and libraries across the state. After 1859, county divorce proceedings were filed in the county's Chancery Clerk's office.